Diary of a medical scientist
medicalschool:

Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

medicalschool:

Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

Path Bites: Quick white blood cell review‏

medblrreblogs:

Path Bites from Pathology Student 19/08/14

Here’s a very quick and simple review of white blood cells.

image

  • Neutrophils: fight bacteria, participate in inflammatory responses. 10 o’clock and 3 o’clock in the image above.
  • Lymphocytes: participate in adaptive immune responses, fight viruses. 8 o’clock in the image above.
  • Monocytes: phagocytic (turn into macrophages), participate in immune responses by displaying antigens. 8 o’clock above.
  • Eosinophils: participate in allergic responses, fight parasites, increased in drug reactions. 2 o’clock above.
  • Basophils: participate in allergic reactions, increased in cases of chronic myeloid leukemia. 4 o’clock above. 

For more on normal white blood cells, see Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease (“big Robbins”) 9th edition, page 580 (or 8e, page 590).

currentsinbiology:

Sounds you can’t hear can still hurt your ears
A wind turbine, a roaring crowd at a football game, a jet engine running full throttle: Each of these things produces sound waves that are well below the frequencies humans can hear. But just because you can’t hear the low-frequency components of these sounds doesn’t mean they have no effect on your ears. Listening to just 90 seconds of low-frequency sound can change the way your inner ear works for minutes after the noise ends, a new study shows.

“Low-frequency sound exposure has long been thought to be innocuous, and this study suggests that it’s not,” says audiology researcher Jeffery Lichtenhan of the Washington University School of Medicine in in St. Louis, who was not involved in the new work.

 The functioning of the inner ear is at least temporarily altered by exposure to low-frequency sounds.  Alex Luengo/iStockphoto/Thinkstock

currentsinbiology:

Sounds you can’t hear can still hurt your ears

A wind turbine, a roaring crowd at a football game, a jet engine running full throttle: Each of these things produces sound waves that are well below the frequencies humans can hear. But just because you can’t hear the low-frequency components of these sounds doesn’t mean they have no effect on your ears. Listening to just 90 seconds of low-frequency sound can change the way your inner ear works for minutes after the noise ends, a new study shows.

“Low-frequency sound exposure has long been thought to be innocuous, and this study suggests that it’s not,” says audiology researcher Jeffery Lichtenhan of the Washington University School of Medicine in in St. Louis, who was not involved in the new work.

 The functioning of the inner ear is at least temporarily altered by exposure to low-frequency sounds.  Alex Luengo/iStockphoto/Thinkstock

fishandfly90:

Cerebellum #histology #facebookforlearning #brains #zombiesbelikeyum

fishandfly90:

Cerebellum #histology #facebookforlearning #brains #zombiesbelikeyum

Diary of a medical scientist turned 3 today!
Happy birthday to meee!

Diary of a medical scientist turned 3 today!

Happy birthday to meee!

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic looks at the 20 common amino acids that are combined to make up the proteins in our bodies. It also gives the three-letter and one-letter codes for each, as well as denoting whether they are ‘essential’ or ‘non-essential’.Read more information & grab the PDF here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-tu

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic looks at the 20 common amino acids that are combined to make up the proteins in our bodies. It also gives the three-letter and one-letter codes for each, as well as denoting whether they are ‘essential’ or ‘non-essential’.

Read more information & grab the PDF here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-tu

bpod-mrc:

08 October 2014
White Matters
The brain is often called our grey matter but it also contains white matter, a tissue once thought to be passive but now known to help transmit nerve impulses. To understand more about white matter, researchers scanned 24 regions of the brain in people aged 7 to 85. They found that white matter, like most tissues, matures then deteriorates with age – but this rate of change varies, for example occurring much more rapidly in regions of the brain dealing with learning than those dealing with movement. A map of the brain, pictured, was constructed from the study, with different colours representing how quickly white matter changes with age – red is fastest and blue slowest. This type of brain mapping may help doctors diagnose and treat a range of disorders associated with white matter abnormalities including schizophrenia, autism, learning disabilities and multiple sclerosis.
Written by Mick Warwicker
—
Image by Aviv Mezer and colleagues Stanford University, USA Copyright held by Nature Publishing Group Research published in Nature Communications, September 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

08 October 2014

White Matters

The brain is often called our grey matter but it also contains white matter, a tissue once thought to be passive but now known to help transmit nerve impulses. To understand more about white matter, researchers scanned 24 regions of the brain in people aged 7 to 85. They found that white matter, like most tissues, matures then deteriorates with age – but this rate of change varies, for example occurring much more rapidly in regions of the brain dealing with learning than those dealing with movement. A map of the brain, pictured, was constructed from the study, with different colours representing how quickly white matter changes with age – red is fastest and blue slowest. This type of brain mapping may help doctors diagnose and treat a range of disorders associated with white matter abnormalities including schizophrenia, autism, learning disabilities and multiple sclerosis.

Written by Mick Warwicker

Image by Aviv Mezer and colleagues
Stanford University, USA
Copyright held by Nature Publishing Group
Research published in Nature Communications, September 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

rachelanthropus:

Cells in the mouse retina
Purple: Cones. 
Orange: Horizontal cells. 
Green: Bipolar cells. 
Magenta: Amacrine + Ganglion cells.
source

rachelanthropus:

Cells in the mouse retina

  • Purple: Cones.
  • Orange: Horizontal cells.
  • Green: Bipolar cells.
  • Magenta: Amacrine + Ganglion cells.

source

Can I ask what kind of things you studied during your degree, is there a lot of chemistry? 😁
Anonymous

There wasn’t a lot of pure chemistry, no. I did a module of it in first year but after that it was biochemistry or cell signalling pathways which were studied.
The subjects which were mostly there were haematology, blood transfusion, microbiology, virology, anatomy, physiology, cell pathology, biochemistry and statistics. There are probably a  few more I’m forgetting, but that’s the general gist.

life-of-a-medical-student:

Congestive Heart Failure

life-of-a-medical-student:

Congestive Heart Failure