Diary of a medical scientist

house-of-gnar:

Cellular SEM’s | Zeiss Microscopy

  1. A mouse’s fat cells (red) are shown surrounded by a network of blood vessels (green). Fat cells store and release energy, protect organs and nerve tissues, insulate us from the cold and help us absorb important vitamins. Image courtesy of Daniela Malide, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
  2. Cells use bubble-like structures called vesicles (yellow) to import, transport and export cargo and in cellular communication. A single cell may be filled with thousands of moving vesicles. Image courtesy of Tatyana Svitkina, University of Pennsylvania. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
  3. This image captures Purkinje cells, one of the main types of nerve cell found in the brain. These cells have elaborate branching structures called dendrites that receive signals from other nerve cells. Image courtesy of Yinghua Ma and Timothy Vartanian, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
  4. This image shows an osteosarcoma cell with DNA in blue, energy factories (mitochondria) in yellow and actin filaments, part of the cellular skeleton, in purple. One of the few cancers that originate in the bones, osteosarcoma is extremely rare, with less than a thousand new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. Image courtesy of Dylan Burnette and Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
  5. Bacteriophages are viruses which infect bacteria. They do this by injecting genetic material into the bacteria which then takes up the DNA and incorporates it into its own genome for replication. Bacteriophages are among the most common and diverse entities in the biosphere.
  6. This image captures the many layers of nerve cells in the retina. The top layer (green) is made up of cells called photoreceptors that convert light into electrical signals to relay to the brain. The two best-known types of photoreceptor cells are rod- and cone-shaped. Rods help us see under low-light conditions but can’t help us distinguish colors. Cones don’t function well in the dark but allow us to see vibrant colors in daylight. Image courtesy of Wei Li, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
  7. This cell is preparing to divide. Two copies of each chromosome (blue) are lined up next to each other in the center of the cell. Next, protein strands (red) will pull apart these paired chromosomes and drag them to opposite sides of the cell. The cell will then split to form two daughter cells, each with a single, complete set of chromosomes. Image courtesy of Jane Stout, Indiana University. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.

darude-sandstorm-official:

i love doing microscope work. theyre like little full moons of color and texture.

heythereuniverse:

Cochlea of the inner ear | wellcome images

heythereuniverse:

Cochlea of the inner ear | wellcome images

microculture:

Cultured Bacteria

microculture:

Cultured Bacteria

lovethescience:

This shows the presence of chlamydia in a pap smear (collected from the cervix of women)

lovethescience:

This shows the presence of chlamydia in a pap smear (collected from the cervix of women)

ah-thenah:

Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder characterized by clotting in small blood vessels of the body (thromboses), resulting in a low platelet count. In its full-blown form, the disease consists of the pentad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, neurologic abnormalities, fever, and renal disease.”

Image 1: Peripheral smear from a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: Red blood cells are fragmented and appear as schistocytes. Certain schistocytes have the appearance of helmet cells (H). Spheroidal cells often are present (S). Occasional nucleated erythroid precursors may be present.

Image 2: A small platelet-fibrin thrombus is seen in a glomerular capillary above the arrow. This occurred in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This rare coagulopathy mainly affects kidneys, heart, and brain with small arteriolar thrombi. Acute renal failure can occur. The classic pentad of fever, acute renal failure, neurologic changes, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia is often present.

Sources: [x] [x]

nami-shark8me:

#microscopy #tma

nami-shark8me:

#microscopy #tma

fishandfly90:

This one’s for all you zombies out there. Braiiins #cerebelum #histology  (at University of the Sunshine Coast)

fishandfly90:

This one’s for all you zombies out there. Braiiins #cerebelum #histology (at University of the Sunshine Coast)

i-heart-histo:

My ptosis
i♡histo
heythereuniverse:

Three-dimensional map of a rotavirus | ZEISS Microscopy
This image shows a three-dimensional reconstruction of a rotavirus at a magnification of about 50,000. Rotavirus infects humans as well as other animals and causes severe diarrhea in infants and young children. There are very few fatalities in the United States and other places where a vaccine is available, but elsewhere, the virus is responsible for more than 450,000 deaths each year. Image courtesy of the National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. 

heythereuniverse:

Three-dimensional map of a rotavirus | ZEISS Microscopy

This image shows a three-dimensional reconstruction of a rotavirus at a magnification of about 50,000. Rotavirus infects humans as well as other animals and causes severe diarrhea in infants and young children. There are very few fatalities in the United States and other places where a vaccine is available, but elsewhere, the virus is responsible for more than 450,000 deaths each year. Image courtesy of the National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.